Cat Fostering

Foster families are essential to the welfare of animals that come into DCAS's care each year. Many of the cats & kittens cared for by DCAS require additional time & care from staff and volunteers before they are emotionally & physically well enough to be adopted! Often times, animals do better in a home environment rather than in the shelter environment.  This is where you come in...

Foster families help an animal grow, heal, socialize, and thereby improve their welfare & the likelihood of a successful adoption. All supplies and medical care are paid for by the shelter... In turn, you will be paid with cuddles and knowing you're helping an animal in need. Situations when we need cat volunteer foster homes are:

Cat with a medical condition undergoing treatment (Frequently needed!)
Some cases may require a cat-free home and/or a spare room. Experience is not necessary as training can be provided. Foster parent must be able to administer medications and provide transportation for pre-scheduled or emergent veterinary care.

Cats requiring socialization (Frequently needed!)
Experience with fear or anxiety is an asset however training can be provided (a combination of online & one-on-one)

Pregnant Cat
Experience with cat birth and a spare room are required. Foster must be able to transport the cat for pre-scheduled or emergent veterinary care.

Mom cat (social) and kittens
A spare room/bathroom in a quiet home is required and foster parent must be able to transport the kittens for check-up appointments and scheduled treatment visits.

Mom cat (feral) and kittens
A spare room/bathroom in a quiet home is required and foster parent must be able to transport the kittens for check-up appointments and scheduled treatment visits. Experience with fearful or feral cats is an asset but not required as training can be provided. 

Orphaned kittens
Training is provided but this is a time intensive volunteer role which sometimes requires around the clock care. Foster parent must be able to transport the kittens for check-up appointments and scheduled treatment visits.


Time commitment: Foster homes may be asked to commit to a timeline of a few days up to a few months, though the fostered animal(s) can be returned to the shelter if unexpected circumstances arise. Foster parents must be available to spend time with and monitor the pets every day.

Travel: Some travel by the foster parent is required as the animals will have to be driven back to the shelter on occasion for regular and pre-scheduled medical care (vaccines, worm and flea treatments) but also for possible trips to the vet for appointments and/or unexpected emergencies.

Requirements: Current pets in the home must be up to date on vaccines, worm and flea treatments. Foster parents must be able to administer medications as required and be able to ensure the fostered pets can coexist with existing ones. There will be situations where the fostered pet needs to be isolated.  In addition, as some cats may be fearful, anxious and/or unpredictable, not all cats may be suitable for certain foster homes.

Foster volunteers must be 19 years or older and may be required to get a police information check done prior to fostering any animals.