Alabama Possible


Cash for College encourages Alabama high schools to rally around Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) completion. The FAFSA is required for any student seeking federal and state financial aid, including grants and loans in all colleges. According to the US Department of Education, 9 out of 10 students who complete a FAFSA attend college the following fall.

Many Alabama students qualify for Pell Grants of up to $5,920 per year. Pell Grants do not have to be repaid. Students planning to enroll in college in Fall 2018 may complete their FAFSA as early as October 1, 2017. 

 

OUR VALUES

College is postsecondary education. College is the attainment of valuable postsecondary credentials beyond high school, including professional/technical certificates and academic degrees.

College is a necessity. Postsecondary education is a prerequisite for success in a knowledge-based economy. Everyone must pursue and complete postsecondary credentials or degrees beyond high school.

College is for everyone. The postsecondary education attainment rates among low-income students and students of color are significantly lower than those of other students. Alabama Possible commits to closing these gaps.

College is a public good. Postsecondary educational opportunity and attainment are critical to a just and equitable society, strong economy, and healthy communities.

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Mission Statement

Alabama Possible is a statewide nonprofit organization that removes barriers to prosperity in Alabama through education, collaboration, and advocacy. Our research-driven work is designed to broaden relationships and enhance capacity building, with a focus on addressing systemic poverty. We believe that it is possible for all Alabamians to lead prosperous lives, and our programs work to make that possibility a reality. We have been working to change the way people think and talk about poverty in Alabama since 1993.