Opportunities - De-Adoption Beta-Blockers in patients with stable ischemic heart disease without Reduced LV ejection fraction, ongoing Ischemia, or Arrhythmias: a pragmaTic randomizEd trial (ABBREVIATE)

De-Adoption Beta-Blockers in patients with stable ischemic heart disease without Reduced LV ejection fraction, ongoing Ischemia, or Arrhythmias: a pragmaTic randomizEd trial (ABBREVIATE)

Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta

 

Background

An estimated 2.4 million Canadians are living with coronary artery disease, which reduces blood flow to the heart muscle. Although the risk of dying has been decreasing for both acute coronary syndromes (also known as heart attacks) and stable coronary disease (also known as stable ischemic heart disease, SIHD), the number of medications prescribed to patients has risen. One class of drugs routinely prescribed to patients with SIHD is beta-blockers. Evidence supporting beta-blocker use stems exclusively from clinical trials performed a long time ago, when current treatments were not available. Because of this, we don’t know if beta-blockers are beneficial drugs in the current treatment age.

Beta blockers have potential side effects, such as low blood pressure, depression, diabetes, and erectile dysfunction in men. Beta-blockers can also interact with other medications to cause complications due to drug-drug interactions. It is unknown if long-term use of beta-blockers is beneficial in patients with SIHD or prior MI, however most patients with SIHD or prior MI remain on beta-blockers.

We are developing a clinical trial that will evaluate whether continuation or discontinuation of beta-blockers in patients with SIHD, or who have had a heart attack and recovered , is safe and effective. This project has the potential to affect recommendations in clinical treatment guidelines that will improve outcomes in patients with heart disease.

 

Roles and Responsibilities

We are looking for patient partners who have lived experience with either stable ischemic heart disease or who have had an acute coronary syndrome in the past and have recovered.

Currently we are actively planning the first phase of our clinical trial. We would like patient input and perspective into the design and study method for this project. We would also like advice on how to promote study recruitment more widely, and to be more inclusive of all Alberta populations, including age, gender, rural and urban.

This study is not yet funded. If successful in grant competitions, there may be opportunities for future involvement when we start study roll-out and expand to the full-scale trial.

 

Time Commitment

We will hold a single virtual meeting in July/August 2021 and then intermittent reach-outs every other month between September 2021 – March 2022 to gain insights on how best to design participant recruitment strategies for the first phase of the study. Meetings are anticipated to be 60-90 minutes each.

Grants for the full study will be submitted starting in Spring of 2022. If this study is funded, the larger study will start in the summer/fall of 2022 and will run for up to 7 years. Future meetings are possible as the trial expands or trial issues arise.

 

Reimbursement/Compensation

The first 60-90 minute meeting will be held online. Patient partners will be offered a gift card of $25 for their contributions at the initial meeting.

 

For more information or to apply please contact:

Sean van Diepen                                                         Leiah Luoma

Sv9@ualberta.ca                                                        lluoma@ualberta.ca