MISSOURI STATE PARKS


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ANNIE AND ABEL VAN METER STATE PARK

About Annie and Abel Van Meter State Park

Annie and Abel Van Meter State Park features remnants of the Missouria Indian village that sat at the Great Bend of the Missouri River, marked on a map by Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet in 1673. A hand-dug earthwork -- Old Fort -- and several burial mounds lie within the park’s boundaries. The state’s Indian history is interpreted in displays and exhibits at the park’s Missouri’s American Indian Cultural Center. For outdoor enthusiasts, the park features hiking trails and an 18-acre fishing lake. Trails lead visitors through the Oumessourit Natural Area with views of the freshwater marsh and through bottomland and upland forests. The park’s lofty trees shade picnic sites, picnic shelters and a campground.

General Interests

Park Aide

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BATTLE OF PILOT KNOB STATE HISTORIC SITE

About Battle of Pilot Knob State Historic Site

Today, the Arcadia Valley in Iron County is a peaceful setting in one of Missouri’s most scenic areas. But in September 1864, the valley was the scene of one of the largest and most hard-fought battles waged on the state’s soil—the Battle of Pilot Knob. During the battle, Confederate Maj. Gen. Sterling Price led an army of 8,000 men against the Union post of Fort Davidson at Pilot Knob.

Battle of Pilot Knob State Historic Site preserves Fort Davidson and the battlefield where so many Confederate and Union soldiers lost their lives. A visitor center and museum interprets the conflict with exhibits, audiovisual presentations and a fiber optics diorama of the battle. The site’s playground, picnic area and hiking trail provide relaxing ways to spend the afternoon.

Temporary Volunteer

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BENNETT SPRING STATE PARK

About Bennett Spring State Park

The valley that cradles Bennett Spring has created a place of peace and recreation that has welcomed generations of enthusiastic anglers. Bennett Spring State Park is one of Missouri’s earliest state parks and continues today to attract fishermen and nature lovers seeking to make new memories.

More than 100 million gallons of clear, cool water gush from Bennett Spring each day and form a spring branch stocked daily with rainbow trout waiting for lucky fishermen. Fishing may be the main draw but the park also offers many other amenities such as a dining lodge, campgrounds, cabins and hiking trails. Whether you are a traditional fishing enthusiast or someone seeking a place to relax and refresh, Bennett Spring State Park has what you need to make every trip one to remember.

Interpreter/Stewardship - Nature Center

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CROWDER STATE PARK

About Crowder State Park

Crowder State Park provides 1,912 acres in the rolling green hills of northern Missouri. Visitors can enjoy more than 17 miles of hiking, bicycling, backpacking and equestrian trails in a forested, rugged terrain. The park also offers fishing and boating opportunities on 18-acre Crowder Lake. The family-oriented campground includes modern restrooms and shady picnic sites are scattered throughout the park.  

General Interests

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GRAHAM CAVE STATE PARK

About Graham Cave State Park

A walk in Graham Cave State Park is a walk through ancient history. Artifacts uncovered in Graham Cave reveal that people occupied the cave 8,000 to 10,000 years ago. To walk through the park’s 386 scenic acres, which includes the diverse Graham Cave Glades Natural Area, is to walk in the footsteps of the hunter-gatherers who lived in the area’s caves during the ancient Dalton and Archaic period. Visitors can go into the mouth of Graham Cave, and interpretive exhibits along Graham Cave Trail detail the life researchers believe early inhabitants lived. Additional interpretive exhibits throughout the park explain the cultural and natural significance of the site. Graham Cave State Park is a prime hiking location, and the campground is perfect for get-togethers in a quiet place. A boat ramp to the Loutre River provides access for boating and fishing.

Temporary Volunteers

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PRAIRIE STATE PARK

About Prairie State Park

Tallgrass prairies once covered more than a third of Missouri; today, less than one percent remains, much of it preserved at Prairie State Park. Visitors to the park see panoramic vistas of swaying grass and ever-changing wildflowers. They also may spot the park’s resident bison herd. The park’s Regal Tallgrass Prairie Nature Center offers exhibits and interpretive programs designed to inform visitors about the special place.

General Interests

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ROCK BRIDGE MEMORIAL STATE PARK

About Rock Bridge Memorial State Park

Just minutes from Columbia, Rock Bridge Memorial State Park gives visitors the chance to scramble, hike and bicycle through a scenic environment – and lets them peek into Missouri’s underworld. The park contains some of the most popular hiking trails in the state and also offers solitude while hiking in the Gans Creek Wild Area. Visitors can also see a large cave system with its rock bridge, sinkholes, a spring and underground stream at the Devil's Icebox. You can explore Connor's Cave in the light of the opening for a taste of the underground world. 

Uncategorized

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THOUSAND HILLS STATE PARK

About Table Rock State Park

Nestled near one of the hottest tourist towns in the United States, Table Rock State Park serves as Branson’s natural getaway and an outdoor recreation base camp for those wanting to take in the area’s abundant attractions.

The park is also handy if you are seeking outdoor adventures. If water recreation is what you desire, State Park Marina rents everything from ski boats to paddle boards and offers all the supplies you will need for a day on the water, whether it is a relaxing day of fishing or an exciting day of skiing. For land-based activities, take a hike or go for a bicycle ride on a paved trail or a challenging mountain biking trail.

The park is also a popular resting spot for those wanting to take in the area attractions. Located among oak and hickory trees, basic, electric and sewer/electric/water campsites wind along the shoreline of the lake. Visitors can also stay in the premium yurt.

Just coming for the day? Numerous picnic sites are scattered near the lakeshore. An open picnic shelter, perfect for family reunions and get-togethers, can be reserved by contacting the park office. Although there is not a designated beach, you can swim in several areas of the park.

Natural Resource Aide Volunteer

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TRAIL OF TEARS STATE PARK

Check out our new Park Aide-Maintenance and Interpretive-Visitor Center volunteer opportunities now available!! 

About Trail of Tears State Park

Gain a better understanding of one of the saddest chapters in American history at Trail of Tears State Park, where nine of the 13 Cherokee Indian groups being relocated to Oklahoma crossed the Mississippi River during harsh winter conditions in 1838 and 1839. The park’s visitor center tells the tale of the thousands who died on the forced march, as well as the park’s many natural features. The park also has a cheerier side: shaded picnic sites, hiking and horse trails, opportunities to fish in both the Mississippi River and Lake Boutin, and majestic views of the Mississippi River and beyond. Its location right on the river makes the park one of the best places in Missouri for viewing migratory waterfowl.

General Interests

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